I am a web developer. I've done a bunch of stuff.. I think. Recently, launched a new pencilkings.com, and an energy visualization data analytics tool with Blue Terminal.

Currently living in Canada.

I like running,

I am a fan of Jebediah Kerman.

www.facebook.com/nigel.fish

twitter.com/nigelfish

www.linkedin.com/in/fishnigel

plus.google.com/+NigelFish/

instagram.com/dphrag

16TTRq3VKip4iQ8d67j8wMveaTeUiXXjqU

www.strava.com/athletes/4476850

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github.com/dphrag

Nigel Fish

Some Data Analysis of Running Toward my 2015 Goal!

2 min read

Was sitting down with a friend examining all of my collected running data from Strava. Some pretty cool graphs!

running Progress

Last year I had set myself a goal of 500 miles, which I came just shy of. This year I said 750 miles, however, I've also stopped talking in miles because to hell with that, so my new goal would be about 1200kms. This is a pretty ambitious goal and I was slowed down at the beginning of the year, so although I hate doing it, I think shooting for 1000kms is more realistic -- and more round and cool sounding anyway!

My other goal was to run my first half-marathon, which I'm doing next week. :)

Onto the next cool graph...

Heart rate monitors are fun

This is a graph when I was doing some 800m intervals. What's cool about this is that *apparently* your heart rate recovery rate is a pretty decent independent predictor of cardiovascular fitness and mortality risk. I can roughly calculate my average 1-minute and 2-minute HRrecovery rates to be 38.75 and 51.75 respectively. The studies I found on recovery rate as a predictor for increased risk of death, refer to rates below 12 for 1-minute, and below 42 for 2-minute recovery.

Which according to this awesome chart taken from an NEJM (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10536127), means I'm probably pretty healthy :)

 

Recover Rate vs Risk

 

Also, this is probably more important in people less than 65 years old.

Final graph:

Dialing it back

This graph, though maybe harder to see, but it shows me attempting to scale back my pace so I can run longer distances. In 2014 I never really ran anything more than 10kms, which is fine, but going further requires a focus on dialing it back a little to conserve energy for the long haul. This has definitely taken some practice.

Next year though, I'm going to attack my 10km time, and aim for something closer to 45 minutes. My current 10km best is 46:59.

Data is cool! :)

Nigel Fish

First Run with a Heart Monitor, and Coming Upon an Unconscious Person.

4 min read

I returned to Taipei for a month, and got to hit my first run back in the new city with a heart rate monitor I borrowed from a friend. I was looking forward to seeing the data, but not expecting what happened during my run.

My friend and I launched out and I separated from my friend as I was running a faster pace. After only about 4 minutes of running, I came upon a man splayed out on the ground, with a bicycle helmet on and some other biking gear, seemingly unconscious. Another man was administering a poor imitation of CPR.

What's kind of morbidly cool, is you can see my reaction to coming upon this scene on my heart rate monitor on my Strava recoding, though I've highlighted the interesting bit here:

 

Heart Rate Uptick

 

I'm pretty sure that is definitely an uptick the moment I saw and realized a man was passed out on the trail and sufferring a serious medical issue! I find that pretty damn interesting. Unfortunately, because I stopped moving at this point, Strava deleted my non-moving data, and that's why it appears my heart rate then dropped rapidly, however, there is actually about a 2 minute gap there.

What happened next was somewhat confusing, and a very good lesson in what can go wrong in an emergency situation. Firstly, I arrived and saw a woman on her phone with emergency services, and another man, as I mentioned, administering a terrible imitation of CPR. He was basically nudging the man's chest.

My friend caught up shortly, and I asked her if she knew first aid. She checked the man's vitals. He was breathing, had a heart rate, and we couldn't actually see anything visibly wrong with him. We thought maybe he'd had a seizure, though as it later turned out he was definitely concussed as his bicycle helmet (which we couldn't see as it was under his head) had been severely damaged. I've never even seen a bicycle helmet exploded like that.

Unfortunately, my grasp on Chinese is not particularly strong, and most of the people gathering around did not speak English. We struggled to tell the man nudging the guys chest that it's really not necessary. Then, most unfortunately, another man rushed into the scene. He said something to me in Chinese, and as he seemed eager to move into the scene, I mistakenly felt that maybe he was a medical professional.

What a mistake!

This man proceeded to start punching the guy in the side of the neck, grabbed his nose (closing his airway), and then punched the man in the face. Holy shit! The way he was doing it implied that it was something he may have actually learned to do which is probably even the more shocking thing about it. He even ordered the other man who was doing the crappy CPR to begin administering pinching of the achilles heal.

What the fuck!

Again, we struggled to gain control of the people who, seemingly didn't really trust we might be the most knowledgeable people there. Despite the language gap, it was clear no one knew what to do.

At this point we were simply watching his vitals and trying to keep people from maybe punching him in the head! Around this time we noticed the severely damaged helmet and realized he was definitely suffering a serious head injury.

Way too many people started to crowd around and were asking us if we knew him and so on. He started to regain consciousness, and while he started to try and get up, we couldn't seem to convince people to tell him he should not get up.

Fortunately paramedics showed up, and once they took over the scene, we took off shortly after, as it felt pretty weirdly chaotic at that point, and we couldn't be of any further assistance.

Then I went for a 7.7km run. :|